Background

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) published the 2015 Open Payments data, along with newly submitted and updated payment records for the 2013 and 2014 reporting periods yesterday, June 30, 2016.

As a broad overview, for Open Payments program year 2015, health care industry manufacturers reported $7.52 billion in payments and ownership and investment interests to physicians and teaching hospitals. This amount encompasses 11.9 million records attributable to 618,931 physicians and 1,116 teaching hospitals.

The Open Payments 2015 program year is the second full year of data available and allows the public the opportunity to explore trends in the health care industry manufacturers’ payments to physicians and teaching hospitals for items and services such as food and beverage, travel, education, honoraria, and research.

In the 2015 program year, there was a notable shift toward charitable contributions and fewer payments to physicians in the form of honoraria and gifts. In terms of dollar value, companies increased charitable contributions on behalf of physicians by over 120%. Payments for food and beverage, travel and lodging, and consulting fees were either flat or slightly declined. Payments for honoraria declined by about fifty percent and by more than thirty percent for gifts.

Graph from CMS blog post 6-30-2016


Annual Comparisons

To compare year to year progress of Open Payments Records and Reporting, see the below table, which highlights the number of records and covered entities for 2013, 2014, and 2015. For 2015 the number of companies reporting payments actually dropped by 7.8%, the number of physicians remained the same, the number of teaching hospitals dropped slightly probably due to consolidation in that industry. Total number of payments grew by less than .3% so no real differences.

The total payments made to physicians actually fell in two of the major categories, when comparing 2014 data to 2015 data, as outlined in the chart below.

When examining the same data for teaching hospitals, interestingly, the payments for research dropped a significant amount while general payments rose slightly. The drop in research could be caused by more payments selected for delay of reporting.

From Policy & Medicine, July 1, 2016, by Thomas Sullivan